Interviews BYOG(group)2*

Published on November 12th, 2013 | by Ballard Lesemann

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The Punch List with BYOG Drummer JP Treadaway

Metronome Charleston‘s weekly Punch List puts local musicians on the spot with a questionnaire that touches on music, venues, gear, records, vices, and more. This week, local musician JP Treadaway, the skillful timekeeper for Lowcountry-based rock band BYOG, responds to the list.

1. What is your favorite local hang and why?

“Definitely the Pour House. There’s free live music on the deck seven days a week as well as awesome shows inside. It’s hard to beat a place like that.

The Pour House has a sense of familiarity for us that a lot of other venues don’t have. We’re lucky to have a place where we can see not only our favorite local musicians play regularly, but also national touring acts such as Keller Williams, Leftover Salmon, Peter Rowan … and the list goes on.

Our friends who have moved from Charleston usually seem to be traveling to see music that we’re able to see right in our own backyard. Charleston has great weather year round, which makes the deck an ideal spot to listen to music and be outside at the same time. We’ve also become friends with a lot of the staff at the Pour House, which makes it our go-to spot.”

BYOG(group)1

BYOG in Austin, Texas, 2013 (provided)

2. You know you’ve played an excellent show when…

“We have a lively crowd with us until the end!”

3. What was the last show you attended that really got you fired up in a good or bad way?

“Widespread Panic and Umphrey’s McGee a few weeks back at Daniel Island [at the Family Circle Stadium] was the last show we all attended as a band, and that was incredible. Seeing two of our favorite bands at that venue with all of our Charleston friends was pretty awesome. We also played on the Pour House deck before the Omega Moo’s, which featured members of Umphrey’s and the New Deal. That was a lot of fun as well.

4. Define your musical style in exactly 10 words.

“Groovy-sounding, hot and heavy, funk, soul, rock and roll.”

5. What’s your theme song? And why?

“‘After Midnight’ by JJ Cale because that’s when we let it all hang out.”

6. Gear-wise, what’s is your irreplaceable baby?

“Probably our PA. When we met [bassist] John Wienand, we were in the process of shopping for new gear as we lost most of ours when the original version of the group dispersed. We were scraping pennies together, trying to save up for a decent sound system, and John casually mentioned he had some equipment back home in Atlanta that he used for gigs in high school. Turns out the equipment he was referring to was two 12-inch Mackie mains, paired with two performance 15-inch Mackie subs, a 16-channel Mackie board equipped with a compressor, feedback buster, and power conditioner all running through the board.

As far as my equipment goes, I play a Premier Artist Series for-piece Birch kit with Meinl cymbals up top and an assortment of hardware I’ve collected over the years.”

BYOGalbum

7. What’s the most overplayed album in your collection? 

Waiting for Columbus by Little Feat, Panic in the Streets by Widespread Panic, At Fillmore East by the Allman Brothers, and any live Dead. Pretty much any live recording is played pretty often in all of our collections. It’s all about energy during live performances in the kind of music we enjoy playing and listening to. So that, in a sense, is what makes a concert album great. Also, it’s the unexpectedness of a live recorded performance; no song can ever be exactly the same, which makes for a unique listening experience.”

8. When was the last time you were genuinely star-struck?

“Meeting Ryan Stasik, Kris Myers, and Andy Farag of Umphrey’s McGee was pretty cool. Ryan and Andy both recently moved to Charleston, so we see them around frequently, which is pretty awesome. But they’re all really cool, down-to-earth guys, so we weren’t as much star-struck as we were just pumped to meet and hangout with them.”

9. What’s your poison?

“Live music. While on the road, fast food is an impossible poison to avoid, so that has become somewhat of a routine when we need a fast and cheap solution in fueling up.”

10. In 10 years, I will be…

“We’ll be traveling the world, playing music, and trying to live everyday to the fullest that we can.”

Local jam-rockers BYOG formed in 2011 and worked up several sets of Southern-fried, blues-tinged rock, funk, and reggae tunes. Plenty of jammy covers. Plenty of riffy originals.

Over the last year, the band hit the college bar/music club circuit pretty hard, performing regularly at downtown spots like O’Malley’s, the Silver Dollar, Charleston Beer Works, and Boone’s, as well as the stages of the Pour House, Loggerhead’s, and various festivals and special events.

After a few lineup adjustments, the current BYOG roster is quite solid with Blake Zahnd (on vocals and guitar, Treadaway on drums, John Wienand on bass, Phil Pasquini on keys, and David Buck on lead guitar.

BYOG recently paid tribute to the Band during Halloween week on the Pour House stage with a full set songs and some extra “Halloween covers.” The group will officially release a debut album titled Out of the Dark on Sat. Nov. 23 with an early evening gig on the Pour House deck.

Treadaway and his bandmates recorded the new album over the summer at Arlyn studios in Austin, Texas. “We were very fortunate to play and record in the same studio as many of our idols, like Neil Young, Warren Haynes, and Willie Nelson,” he says. “We’re really looking forward to the release.”

Visit charlestonpourhouse.com, byogmusic.com, and BYOG’s Facebook page for more.

* The clip below features BYOG on stage with guitarist Brock Butler (of Georgia band Perpetual Groove) at a recent Pour House show.

 

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About the Author

Ballard Lesemann

is a musician and writer. Born and raised in Charleston, S.C., he spent years playing in bands and working for Flagpole Magazine in the bustling music town of Athens, Ga. He returned to his hometown and served more than seven years as the Charleston City Paper's music editor. He's better at drumming than he is at playing guitar.



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